Well Iceland operates various locations around Iceland, mostly the southern part of the island. The main locations are Hveragerdi (summer retreat), Vík í Mýrdal  as well as the Blue Lagoon close to Grindavík (featuring in most of the packages). You will find more information on these locations here.

HVERAGERDI

Great numbers of people pass through or by Hveragerði each year. With a population of about 2300 and located only 45 km from Reykjavik, Hveragerði may be viewed from the vantage point of the Kambar mountain slope, as it spreads out across a 5000 year-old lava field. Throughout the year, pillars of steam may be seen rising up from the town – and in summer it is truly a green community, abounding in trees. A green revolution is taking place as areas of woodland in and around Hveragerði expand, with the locals working together in order to further develop their blossoming town.

Certainly the most precious gem of the town of Hveragerði is its geothermal area – surely there are not many communities in the world with hot springs literally in their back yard. For safety reasons, the geothermal area is securely fenced off, but may be visited by arrangement with the tourist information centre.

A new hot spring area emerged from the ground in the earthquake that shook Iceland´s southern part on 29th May 2008. It is situated on the hillside rising above the town.
Several very active hot springs throw colourful mud and clear water up into the air and are a spectactular sight.

Besides the hot springs, Hveragerði has much to offer. Trout and salmon swim in the Varmá river, berries are for the picking on the heath to the west of the town, and the area abounds in excellent walking routes. Not to mention the swimming pool, hot baths, whirlpools, a natural sauna and a fitness centre. The Spa where you will be staying throughout your retreat in iceland offers opportunities to seek health and happiness.

VÍK

The beach at Vík is one of the ten most beautiful beaches on Earth. Its stretch of black basalt sand is one of the wettest places in Iceland. The cliffs west of the beach are home to many seabirds, most notably puffins which burrow into the shallow soils during the nesting season. Offshore lie stacks of basalt rock, remnants of a once more extensive cliffline Reynisfjall, now battered by the sea. There is no landmass between here and Antarctica and the Atlantic rollers can attack with full force. According to folklore, they are former trolls who tried to drag their boats out to sea only to be caught by the rising dawn. The sea around them is rather wild and stormy, so travelers will not be surprised to discover a monument to the memory of drowned seamen on the beach.

Despite its small size, the village of Vik and surrounding area offer many options for visitors. There are superb treks for those who enjoy hiking – bear in mind that there aren’t any towns or villages for at least 50-60 km in each direction, so you can walk and enjoy the stunning views without so much as a puffin disturbing your reverie. If you are not into walking, you can join a jeep tour or another guided tour, do some bird-watching, have a dip in one of the many natural pools, dive in the sea, or just relax with a drink in the village.

BLUE LAGOON

The Blue Lagoon (Icelandic: Bláa lónið) geothermal spa is one of the most visited attractions in Iceland. The spa is located in a lava field in Grindavík on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwestern Iceland.

The warm waters are rich in minerals like silica and sulfur and bathing in the Blue Lagoon is reputed to help some people suffering from skin diseases such as psoriasis. The water temperature in the bathing and swimming area of the lagoon averages 37–39 °C (99–102 °F). The Blue Lagoon also operates a research and development facility to help find cures for other skin ailments using the mineral-rich water.

The lagoon is a man-made lagoon which is fed by the water output of the nearby geothermal power plant Svartsengi and is renewed every two days. Superheated water is vented from the ground near a lava flow and used to run turbines that generate electricity. After going through the turbines, the steam and hot water passes through a heat exchanger to provide heat for a municipal water heating system. Then the water is fed into the lagoon for recreational and medicinal users to bathe in.